De la Crème

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All the peacocking aside, fashion week street style is still unbelievably fun and inspiring to look at. Trend-wise, we’re in this weird transitional period between when athletic wear was absolutely everywhere and the steady rise in popularity of 70s boho style. It makes for a really great mix of styles, and it’s nice to see the usual suspects interpret their favourite aspects of each trend, sometimes even incorporating both in the same ensemble. Apologies for the massive photo dump. I just couldn’t choose! So much love.

All images via Vogue.com

Thomas Tait SS16

Untitled-1 Untitled-2 Untitled-3 Untitled-4 Untitled-5 Untitled-6 Untitled-7Thomas Tait is, in my humble opinion, one of the top three most innovative and thoughtful designers working in fashion today. His recent spring summer 2016 collection in London makes me more convinced than ever that my opinion is fact. He works with unconventional colours and combines out-of-the-box fabrics and somehow it all works. The man has taste. He does sexy allure that oozes elegance. His styling is unexpected but impeccable—I never thought a mustard tank top could look so fancy paired with a shaggy jacket. His ability to think of fresh ways to show skin is commendable. I don’t think I’ve ever seen strategically placed, embellished circular holes like these being used to show off some leg. I adore the dark denim with embellished knee holes, which are a welcomed riff on ripped-at-the-knees jeans that have been absolutely everywhere for the past season. I even love the super cakey mascara on some of the models. IT ALL WORKS AND I AM FLABBERGASTED. What a treat it is to experience Tait’s designs season after season. He certainly has a bright future ahead of him.

Images via Vogue.com

Peak Boho

TRF_01_1920 TRF_02_1920 TRF_04_1920 TRF_05_1920 TRF_06_1920 TRF_07_1920 TRF_08_1920 TRF_11_1920 TRF_12_1920 TRF_13_1920 TRF_14_1920 TRF_15_1920 TRF_17_1920 TRF_18_1920A lot has been written about the rise in popularity of 70s boho style, and it doesn’t look like it’s going away anytime soon. Zara recently released their fall womanswear campaign, and it was all bellbottoms, suede jackets, cropped jeans, and fur in rich fall shades. Not everyone is on board. And if I’m being real with you, even if I have been on board in the past, I’m not sure if I’m down with being inundated by all of this print-heavy, flowy clothing. Perhaps it’s because of the changing ways in which we consume fashion and trends, but with each passing season it feels like trends are becoming less and less diverse. Instead of labels sticking with trends that reflect their brand, every label, especially in the fast fashion world, are just going for the same thing. This makes shopping an extremely dull experience, and causes fashion-savvy consumers like myself to grow tired of trends much much faster. Of course there are things I will always love about 70s style, like the cozy long jackets, vibrant hues, and copious amounts of suede. (I hate the printed dresses) But when a trend is this reminiscent of pieces you can find at literally any vintage store in your city, I fail to see the appeal in purchasing it brand new and made with lower quality fabrics.

What do you think about 70s style?

Images via Zara

Northern Exposure

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The Swedes are a well-dressed bunch, and they have a proclivity for ensembles that lean towards the minimal. Fine by me.

This selection of street style shots were taken from outside of participating Stockholm Fashion Week venues, with runway shows taking place last week. Shot by The Locals’ Søren Jepsen, outfits ran the gamut from sporty minimal to 70s minimal to relaxed minimal. I love the understated accessorizing done so well by the Swedes, as well as their unabashed love of American denim.

Special shout out to style.com today, as this is the last day they will be posting content. In its place: Vogue Runway, which will launch in time for the Spring Summer 2016 runway season. While I don’t doubt Vogue has the ability to deliver high-quality runway and street style coverage, I have a bit of a sentimental attachment to style.com, as it’s the website that I relied on the most when I first became interested in runway shows and emerging indie designers. Nothing is permanent, everything is transient, thanks for the proper schooling, style.com ❤

Images via style.com

Faustine Steinmetz

Screen-Shot-2015-05-27-at-10.52.56-786x1024Screen-Shot-2015-05-27-at-10.53.12-796x1024Screen-Shot-2015-05-27-at-10.53.35-737x1024Screen-Shot-2015-05-27-at-10.52.38-780x1024collection-ss15-01You may remember the name Faustine Steinmetz from previous features here on The Pack. I’ve been following the young wunderkind ever since I saw the extremely strong denim work from her debut collection for AW14. Focused on quality, handmade production, and very limited runs, Steinmetz is one of a few “artisanal” designers out there who actually earns the label. Steinmetz isn’t concerned with trends. Her labours of love are atypical, complex, and utterly devoid of references to time periods. Artistic and meticulous to a fault, she creates garments from scratch for a specific type of woman, someone as disdainful of waste as Steinmetz is, perhaps. Or perhaps someone as dedicated to their work, and as unwavering in their principles as Steinmetz is.
11248164_468241010001723_5438389793422372426_nfaustine-steinmetz-autumnwinter-15-body-image-1424617594faustine-steinmetz-autumnwinter-15-body-image-1424617877faustine-steinmetz-autumnwinter-15-body-image-1424617908faustine-steinmetz-autumnwinter-15-body-image-1424618117faustine-steinmetz-autumnwinter-15-body-image-1424618416In spite of (or because of) her rejection of trends, Steinmetz’s clothes more than hold their own among those produced by the world’s most forward-thinking designers. Her creative vision and technical skill caught the eye of the fashion giant LVMH group, and she was a finalist for this year’s Prize for Young Designers. Although she didn’t quite come out on top (competition was very very fierce), it doesn’t take away in the least from what will surely be a long, illustrious career.

You can contact Faustine to order a piece from her here.

Images via Faustine Steinmetz, Wonderland magazine, and Dazed